How to get in shape – 3 styles to consider: Weight Loss

weight loss

This article is part 3 in a 4 part series. In part 1, I wrote about the 3 styles people should consider when deciding how to get in shape. Part 2 dove into what it means to put all your focus on muscle and weight gainIn this article, I will be going into greater detail about what it means to completely focus on weight loss. I will talk about the pros, cons, and what you should focus on instead. 

According to the CDC, obesity rate of adults in America is just over 35%. There are 314 million people living in America (74 million of which are under the age of 18). Do some quick math, and there’s an astounding 85,000,000 adults classified as obese.

With such a high number, losing weight has become a hot topic these days. Losing weight has many great benefits, but is there a possibility for too much of a good thing? There’s an endless supply of articles, photos, videos, and programs aimed at helping people shed a few pounds, but none of them offer any education. It’s a great idea to go into weight loss with some knowledge.

Being overweight certainly comes with a number of health-issues, but so does being too thin.

3 things to keep in mind when it comes to trying to lose weight:

  • How fast is too fast for weight loss?
  • Whats causing the weight loss?
  • The health risks associated with losing too much weight.

How fast is too fast for weight loss?

When it comes to losing weight, 1-2 pounds of weight loss is considered healthy and sustainable. On paper, one pound of body fat in the human body is equal to 3,500 calories. Theoretically then, if you eat 500 less calories than you burn a day, you will lose one pound in a week (-500 calories a day X 7 days a week = -3,500 calories a week). In the same regard, if you eat 1,000 less calories than you burn a day, you will lose 3 pounds in a week (-1,000 X 7 days a week = -7,000 calories a week). Losing exactly one or two pounds a week doesn’t play out quite as neatly in real life. It does, however, give a nice guideline to how much weight you can realistically lose while staying healthy.

If someone loses weight rapidly, it’s due to other things in addition to losing fat. Any faster than losing 2 pounds a week and it involves a combination of losing water weight, losing muscle, and the bodies metabolism slowing down.

What’s causing the weight loss?

  1. Losing water weight

    About 60% of our body weight is composed of water. When someone goes on a highly restrictive diet, the body turns to it’s own stored energy, because it’s not getting enough energy from the foods eaten day to day. The stored energy holds water with it and that water is burned up quickly when switching to a restrictive diet.

    A more scientific explanation:One type of stored energy the body turns to is a carbohydrate called glycogen. When the body uses glycogen for energy, the glycogen also releases the water stored in it. There is 4 grams of water accompanying every 1 gram of glycogen. (Read Here). When weight loss is rapid, a significant amount of it is due to this water being released.

  2. Losing muscle

    The more restrictive a diet is, the more the body has to rely on other sources of energy such as the glycogen talked about in the last paragraph. Another place the body turns to when looking for energy is the muscle itself. When the body starts to run low on available energy (glycogen), it turns to the protein in the muscles themselves. Losing muscle instead of the fat is never a good thing. Losing muscle usually leads to false hope on the scales because it’s not actually fat being lost.

  3. Metabolism slowing down

    Highly restrictive diets involve eating a lot less food than normal. When the body is deprived of the amount of food it normally gets, it slows down its metabolism. A slowing metabolism speeds up weight loss but isn’t sustainable, because the metabolism will bounce right back after the restrictive diet is over.

The health risks associated with too much weight loss

Too much fat in the body has lots of bad symptoms, but not having enough isn’t any better. A few things that end up happening when someone is too skinny are heart issues, a lowered immune system, anemia, and fertility issues.(Check Here).

Getting too skinny puts a lot of unhealthy strain on the body, so be careful!

Check back next for the final post in this series!

-Adam

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Land Icebergs

Many people know the deal with icebergs thanks to events such as the Titanic or even The Titanic (which no doubt informed a handful of movie-goers who had no clue it was real).

Many more people have probably seen a picture like this at some point in their life:

iceberg

Icebergs are crazy cool and crazy big. They look innocent enough, but when you see the full picture, it’s far from innocent.

Cars are pretty similar.

You see a new car with a sticker that says $30,000 for example (that’s the average price of a new car). It’s a decent amount of money for sure, but there’s lots of things screaming in your face telling you not to worry. There’s the chance of negotiating on price, making car payments, warranties, and 0% interest.

Used cars are significantly cheaper than new cars, but they’re still no small chunk of change. The average price for a used car is $8,495 as of September 2012.

That’s all fine and good, but it’s not really the part that gets you.

From year-to-year, owning a car is expensive. According to this AAA report, the cost of owning an average sized sedan per year is about $9,000. SUVs top the price list, coming in at $11,360 while a small sedan does the best, costing $6,735 a year.

Say you buy a new car and keep it for 10 years. Keeping in mind that a new car costs $30,000 to buy and $9,000 a year to own:

New Car Cost

Likewise, buy a used car and the story is similar (albeit slightly cheaper on the front end):

Used Car Cost

In the end, all the costs under the surface add up to make a picture similar to that of the iceberg. Note that while some of these costs are strictly monetary (new tires, gas, oil change, registration, insurance), some have costs on our mind (more stuff to think about).

Car Iceberg

Make sure your car doesn’t sink your ship.

-Adam Conway

Simple Workout

Simple

Keep workouts simple

When looking for information on working out, it’s easy to feel completely buried in a mountain of information. Every place you look says something different. Lift this way or eat that way. There are millions of free and paid exercise programs to follow, so where should you start? The options become too many and varied so you end up getting overwhelmed and giving up. Why should you even start something when you don’t know if it’s right?

Here’s the easiest way to get in shape:

Start with none of them. Start simple.

The simpler something is, the easier it is to understand. The easier it is to understand, the easier it is to follow.

Doing something is better than doing nothing at all. Do something you actually like doing, even if you hear its not as good as X (whatever workout everyone else says is better).

Here’s a list simple things you can do. I’m not writing down a “program” that should be followed. This is simply a list of simple ideas to get moving:

  • Walk.
  • Run.
  • Jump over/on stuff.
  • Climb up things.
  • Bike.
  • Your favorite sport.

Here’s a list of some simple workouts that can be done anywhere:

  • Push-ups.
  • Pull-ups.
  • Planks.
  • Bodyweight squats.
  • Lunges.
  • Wall sits.

Please comment with your favorite simple workouts!

-Adam Conway